Aug 042013
 

Do you need to know how to write GOOD IEP Goals for spelling? Your child needs goals that let you know whether your child is making good progress.

If you need spelling IEP goals for your child, you also need to understand how to write measurable goals as described below.

Then, use the example IEP spelling goals below as a guideline for writing measurable goals for your child.

For starters, you absolutely must have measurable IEP goals.  Measurable IEP goals for spelling improvement help you AND your child’s school KNOW whether your child is making adequate progress in his spelling abilities.

Learning to to spell well requires a child to have phonemic awareness, knowledge of how to blend sounds for spelling simple words, understanding how to spell multi-syllable words, learning to spell sight words that don’t follow phonemic conventions, and must learn self-correction spelling skills. At various stages of spelling ability you will probably need goals for each level of spelling skill.

In trying to help you understand how to write good, measurable goals, I have included sample goals below for various skills a child must master in order to spell well. For your individual child, you would want to write goals that are similarly worded, but which are based upon your child’s current skill level. To make good goals for your child, you can use the goals below as templates, add new goals like them, or modify these goals directly in order to create great goals for your child’s IEP.

Here are some example, MEASURABLE ANNUAL GOALS:

Given typical 5th grade written assignments, [Child's name] will spell 8 out of 10 words correctly on the first try, in all settings and in all subjects, with less than 3 errors per 100 misspellings involving Sitton (AKS) spelling words 1- 700.

[Child's name] will correctly orient “b” and “d” in spelling 99 out of 100 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child's name] will correctly apply the “FLOSS” spelling rule 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.


[Child's name] will correctly spell words beginning with “wh” or “w” 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child's name] will correctly apply the magic “e” spelling rule 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child's name] will correctly apply rules for words ending with the letter “y” 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings. (change y to i and add es, ed)

[Child's name] will correctly spell words using double vowel sounds 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings. (oa, ie, ea, etc. inclusive of all double vowel combinations)

[Child's name] will correctly use -ed as a suffix in spelling past tense words ending with the “t” sound 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child's name] will correctly utilize suffixes by applying appropriate spelling rules 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child's name] will correctly spell 700 of the first 700 AKS spelling words in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers with 3 or fewer errors per 100 word uses and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child's name] will successfully self-correct 100% of the highlighted spelling errors in his classroom papers when presented a highlighted paper for self-correction and will demonstrate ability to self-correct spelling errors in all classes.

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