Aug 042013
 

If your child’s spelling is horrible, you need GREAT Spelling Goals for IEPs.

Below, I’ve listed several examples of Spelling Goals for IEPs that are SMART, measureable goals. I’ve included an explanation of how to write smart spelling goals for IEPs. Feel free to use these example goals, and adjust them to fit your child’s individual spelling instruction needs.

Before we dive into the spelling goals for IEPs, I’d like to point out that IF your child KNOWS spelling rules, but fails to spell words properly when writing, you might want to consider the research-proven method I used to help my son learn to spell better. My son KNEW the spelling rules, but would not apply them to his writing.

So I went on a quest to find out WHAT WORKS for deeply ingrained spelling difficulties. The research-proven method I used actually worked to improve my son’s spelling by leaps and bounds. Check it out if you need a different type of approach. ;-)

On to the matter of IEP Goals for Spelling:

If your child’s school uses weekly spelling tests as their only means of working on spelling, you probably need to strengthen your child’s spelling instruction and put stronger IEP goals into your child’s IEP. Along with the specific, measurable goals, you’ll need a spelling program that works for kids who have dyslexia.

Your child needs solid IEP goals, so you will know whether your child is making good academic progress in spelling. The information about writing great spelling goals for IEPs as well as the example spelling goals that follow will equip you with the skills you need to help your child receive viable spelling instruction.

How to write GREAT Spelling Goals for IEPs:

Learning to to spell well requires a child to have:

alternative for spelling goals for iep
  • phonemic awareness,
  • knowledge of how to blend sounds for spelling simple words,
  • understanding how to spell multi-syllable words.
  • knowing how to spell sight words that don’t follow phonemic conventions, and
  • must learn self-correction spelling skills.

At various stages of spelling ability you will probably need goals for each of these levels of spelling skill.

Use the SMART acronym to write goals for your child:

 S = Specific – detailed as to exactly what your child will achieve.
M = Measurable – specify how progress will be objectively measured.
A = Attainable – something your child is capable of learning.
R = Realistic – Not too complex or involved for your child to be unable to achieve the goal.
T = Timeframe specified – specify how soon your child will achieve the goal.

In trying to help you understand how to write good, measurable goals, I have included sample spelling goals for IEPs below for various skills a child must master in order to spell well.

For your individual child, you will write goals that are similarly worded, but which are based upon your child’s current skill level. To make great goals for your child, use the goals below as templates, add new goals like them, or modify these goals directly in order to create great goals for your child’s IEP.

Here are some example, MEASURABLE ANNUAL Spelling Goals for IEPs:

Given typical 5th grade written assignments, [Child’s name] will spell 8 out of 10 words correctly on the first try, in all settings and in all subjects, with less than 3 errors per 100 misspellings involving Sitton (AKS) spelling words 1- 700.

[Child’s name] will correctly orient “b” and “d” in spelling 99 out of 100 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child’s name] will correctly apply the “FLOSS” spelling rule 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child’s name] will correctly spell words beginning with “wh” or “w” 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child’s name] will correctly apply the magic “e” spelling rule 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child’s name] will correctly apply rules for words ending with the letter “y” 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings. (change y to i and add es, ed)

[Child’s name] will correctly spell words using double vowel sounds 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings. (oa, ie, ea, etc. inclusive of all double vowel combinations)

[Child’s name] will correctly use -ed as a suffix in spelling past tense words ending with the “t” sound 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child’s name] will correctly utilize suffixes by applying appropriate spelling rules 19 out of 20 times in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child’s name] will correctly spell 700 of the first 700 AKS spelling words in unedited, spontaneously written, classroom papers with 3 or fewer errors per 100 word uses and will demonstrate ability in all settings.

[Child’s name] will successfully self-correct 100% of the highlighted spelling errors in his classroom papers when presented a highlighted paper for self-correction and will demonstrate ability to self-correct spelling errors in all classes.

Lastly, if your child has spelling issues related to dyslexia, I **HIGHLY** recommend you look into The Dyslexia Help Handbook for Parents: Your Guide to Overcoming Dyslexia Including Tools You Can Use for Learning EmpowermentDyslexia Help Handbook for Parents book dyslexic dyslexie books.

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